Dissertation on the Move

I began my Ph.D. program in 2000 and didn’t complete it until 2009.  I don’t recommend taking the 9 year route to completion.  Completing the coursework, at least in hindsight, was easy.  Take a class, write a paper, move on to the next class.  I finished my course work quickly and passed my comps, which left me with 7 years of dissertation writing.  Again, I don’t recommend my path to anyone.  My path, however, was interesting (the sheer number of post-it notes I used could have wallpapered my entire house) and at times positively brutal (on my list of things I don’t recommend is having 3 different dissertation directors).  I learned a lot.

Since I finished school all those years ago, many family members and friends have asked to read my dissertation.  I always demurred, because honestly, I assumed they were just being supportive.

But then the other day I thought, “Why not?”

Why not let people read my dissertation?  Someone might as well see it.

I’m considering this an exercise in reacquainting myself with academic writing.

So, I’m going to post my dissertation serially on my blog.  I’ll try to section it off into manageable chunks and post a chunk once per week until we get through the whole thing or until I receive an outcry demanding I cease.

Today’s chunks are my copyright page and my works cited.  Don’t bother reading them.  I just wanted to make sure I included my copyright information and citations for the entire work.

Next week we’ll get started proper with my abstract.

Post it Notes like I used copiously while writing my dissertation. Image by Pexels on Pixabay at https://pixabay.com/en/post-it-notes-sticky-notes-note-1284667/
Post it Notes like I used copiously while writing my dissertation. Image by Pexels on Pixabay at https://pixabay.com/en/post-it-notes-sticky-notes-note-1284667/

© Copyright by
Roshaunda D. Cade
ALL RIGHTS RESERVED
2009

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