What’s Your Thing?

Today I was thinking about what my thing is.  What I mean is the thing that I fall back on, the thing I find myself returning to when life is great and when it’s difficult.  I was wondering about the thing that represents flow for me – where ability and interest intersect and I become a functioning member of society both giving and exhibiting value.

At first I thought it was writing, but I quickly realized that wasn’t quite right.  Then I thought it was students, but that concept fell short, too.  Next I thought, well, my thing must be helping students write.  I became so convinced of that concept that I began looking for images on my computer that represented that idea to me.

And that’s when I realized that if I base my thing on the pictures I take (which has both its pros and cons), then helping students write cannot be my thing.  I couldn’t find one picture representing that idea.

I know; I know.  Most people don’t have photographic evidence of them at work every day.  And I should be excited that my job entails my passion for helping students learn to become better writers.  But I want pictures!

As I scrolled through the photo library on my computer, I noticed that I take a lot of pictures of my family, of nature, and of architecture.

I certainly wouldn’t consider architecture my thing, but at least now I’m investigating what draws me to it and what meaning it holds for me.  I suppose a picture really is worth a thousand words.

Looking down a staircase at Palais Winkleheim, Webster University's Vienna campus
Looking down a staircase at Palais Winkleheim, Webster University’s Vienna campus

What’s your thing?  Please comment to let me know.

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